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Tribunal Ruling On South China Sea will 'Intensify Conflict', Says Beijing's Envoy
Reacting to Tribunal’s ruling against China in its dispute with the Philippines over South China Sea, Bejing envoy said that ‘the ruling will intensify conflict’.

Reacting to Tribunal’s ruling against China in its dispute with the Philippines over South China Sea, Bejing envoy said that ‘the ruling will intensify conflict’.

Speaking at a Washington think tank, Cui Tiankai said, “the ruling will certainly undermine and weaken the motivation of states to engage in negotiations and consultations for solving their disputes.”

ALSO READ:All Parties Should Show Utmost Respect For South China Sea Ruling: India

Earlier, Bejing also denied to accept or recognize the ruling. “The award is null and void and has no binding force,” the Foreign Ministry of China said.

On the other hand, the US said the International arbitration court’s ruling on the South China Sea should be treated as final and binding and hoped that both China and the Philippines would comply with their obligations.

ALSO READ:Verdict On South China Sea Unacceptable, Says Beijing

In a statement, after the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague on Tuesday ruled there was no legal basis for China to claim historic rights to resources in the South China Sea, State Department spokesperson John Kirby said: “In the aftermath of this important decision, we urge all claimants to avoid provocative statements or actions.”

China on Tuesday suffered a major diplomatic blow when an international tribunal ruled that it violated the Philippines’ rights in the South China Sea. Beijing refused to accept the verdict, calling it “null and void”.

ALSO READ:China Should Be On High Alert After South China Sea Verdict: Report

The Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague accused China of interfering with the Philippines’ fishing and petroleum exploration, building artificial islands in the waters and failing to prevent Chinese fishermen from fishing in the zone, media reports said.

The tribunal held that fishermen from the Philippines had traditional fishing rights in Scarborough Shoal in the South China Sea, and that China had interfered with these rights by restricting their access.

The court held that Chinese law enforcement vessels unlawfully created a serious risk of collision when they physically obstructed Philippine vessels in the region, the South China Morning Post reported.

The South China Sea is a marginal sea that is part of the Pacific Ocean, encompassing an area from the Karimata and Malacca Straits to the Straits of Taiwan, of around 3.5 million sq km.

The South China Sea is a resource rich strategic waterway through which more than $5 trillion worth of global trade is shipped each year. Beijing has placed runways and radar facilities on new islets it has created in the disputed sea after piling huge amounts of sand onto reefs.

The tribunal’s much-anticipated verdict demolished China’s expansive claims and its historical nine-dash line in the disputed South China Sea.