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Thousands of Muslim pilgrims stone the walls, in a ritual called "Jamarat," symbolising stoning the devil, in Mina near the Saudi holy city of Mecca, 20 December 2007. Around two and half million Muslim Hajji pilgrims in Mina during their annual pilgrimage western Saudi Arabia started pelting all three walls representing Satan in another high point, which in past years had fatal results. AFP PHOTO/ROSLAN RAHMAN
A stoning ritual, which led to the deaths of about 2,300 people during last year’s Hajj will be more tightly controlled during next month’s pilgrimage, Saudi newspapers reported on Wednesday.

A stoning ritual, which led to the deaths of about 2,300 people during last year’s Hajj will be more tightly controlled during next month’s pilgrimage, Saudi newspapers reported on Wednesday.

The period during, which pilgrims can perform the Jamarat ritual will be reduced by 12 hours, the Saudi Gazette and Arab News said.

ALSO READ: Iran Blames Saudis For Hajj ‘Sabotage’

The symbolic stoning of the devil will be performed as usual over three days beginning September 11 at Mina, about five kilometres east of Mecca’s Grand Mosque, Islam’s holiest site.

But this year there will be no stoning allowed from 6:00-10:30 am on the first day, from 2:00-6:00 pm on the second day and from 10:30 am to 2:00 pm on the final day, the Hajj ministry said.

ALSO READ: Hajj Stampede: Saudi Arabia Raises Death Toll To At Least 2121

“This procedure will enable the pilgrims to throw stones easily and will prevent any stampede that may result from overcrowding,” the Saudi Gazette quoted ministry undersecretary Hussain al-Sharif as saying.

The stampede was the worst disaster in Hajj history.

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