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The Jungle Book Review: Travel Down The Memory Lane With 'Mowgli'...Utterly Nostalgic!
Inspired from Rudyard Kipling’s Mowgli stories and the hugely successful 1967 Disney screen adaptation, Jon Favreau’s The Jungle Book hits theatres near you.

Directed by: Jon Favreau
Cast: Neel Sethi

Inspired from Rudyard Kipling’s Mowgli stories and the hugely successful 1967 Disney screen adaptation, Jon Favreau’s The Jungle Book hits theatres near you.

The story features first-time actor Neel Sethi who is the only human member of the cast  and an array of computer-generated talking animals. The story remains same as the earlier version, wherein it shows how an orphaned human boy, raised by wolves, along with their packs, live in harmony with the other animals of the jungle.

Things are smooth until one fine day, Shere Khan, the scarred tiger drives Mowgli away from the jungle to join his own species.

ALSO SEE: Watch ‘Jungle Book’ In Pictures

The story beautifully winds up in 106 minutes, and take you back into the memory lane of your good ol’ childhood.

Neel Sethi or Mowgli is the only character in the film, rest are animated. Undoubtedly, he is endearing. His performance is par excellence as he portrays Mowgli’s moods to perfection.

While the sound which includes most of the animal voices and cries, is immersive and all pervasive, the computer-generated images are impressive but the 3D effects do not stimulate you.

ALSO WATCH | ‘The Jungle Book’ Brings Back ‘Jungle Jungle Baat Chali Hai’

The film editing is astonishing, the rhythm of the pace is racy and swift, making the film a highly entertaining one. Direction, cinematography and visual effects are amazing. John Debney’s music is good too.

The Jungle Book is an amazing amalgam of technical wizardry and emotional depth which intelligently deploys fantasy-adventure genre conventions to carve out an immersive movie experience.

The infamous song, ‘Jungle Jungle Baat Chali Hai’, which have made Jungle Book memorable over the years, is missing from the film.