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Envisaging a technological future where computers can learn human language and have conversations with people, Microsoft's India-born CEO Satya Nadella has said companies need to build "respectful" technology which gets the best of humanity and not the worst. "We want to take the power of human language and apply it more pervasively to all of the computing interface and interactions," Nadella said yesterday in his keynote address to thousands of developers at Microsoft's annual Build 2016 conference here. "To do that you have to infuse (intelligence) into the computers around us, you have to bring forth these technologies of artificial intelligence in machine learning so that we can teach computers to learn the human language, have conversational understanding, teach them about the broad contexts of personal preferences and knowledge so that they can help you with your everyday task," Nadella, 48, said. He envisaged a future where the machine is not against man but works with humans to offer seamless interface and experience in day-to-day learning. "All technology that we built has to be more inclusive and respectful..We want to build technology that gets the best of humanity and not the worst," Nadella said. "We want to build intelligence that augments human abilities and experiences. Ultimately it is not going to be about man versus machine. It is going to be about man with machines," he said. Technology where the human ability of judgement creativity, empathy and emotion is combined with the fast computation and ability to reason over large amounts of data, he said. "We want all developers to infuse intelligence into their applications...As we infuse intelligence into everything it is important to have a principled approach," Nadella said. "This will help us move our society forward. You also have to build trust right into our technology that means you have to have technology that has built-in protections for privacy, transparency, security as well as compliance," he said.Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella’s debut book will hit stores next year with the writer saying it is neither a ‘how-to-succeed’ book nor a memoir but about change.

‘Hit Refresh’ follows three storylines: Nadella’s personal journey of transformation, the change that is taking place today inside his storied technology company, and one that is coming in all of our lives as intelligent machines become more ambient and more ubiquitous throughout society, publishers Harper Business said.

“Harper Business, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, has acquired World English rights to Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella’s first book, ‘Hit Refresh’. Hollis Heimbouch, vice-president and publisher, Harper Business, negotiated the deal with James Levine of Levine Greenberg Rostan Literary Agency. The book will be published in Fall 2017,” a statement said.

In the book, Nadella explores how people, organisations, and societies can and must transform – hit refresh – in their persistent quest for new energy, new ideas, relevance and renewal.

Nadella writes that uniquely human qualities like empathy will become more valuable in a world where the torrent of technology will disrupt like never before.

“The acquisition of Satya Nadella’s book continues Harper Business’ tradition of publishing books from some of our most influential business leaders and entrepreneurs. We are thrilled to be working with Satya on this exciting project that provides an inside view of Microsoft’s ongoing transformation,” said Brian Murray, President and CEO of HarperCollins Publishers.

As much a humanist as a technologist, Nadella defines his mission and that of the company he leads as empowering every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more.

“This book is about change,” said Nadella.

“It is not a ‘how to succeed’ book, nor is it a memoir – it’s premature for that. Ultimately, I am writing for Microsoft team members, customers, and partners in hopes that these stories of transformation will be useful to them as they navigate their own path.”

The author’s proceeds from the book will be donated to Microsoft Philanthropies to benefit nonprofits, specifically those working on public cloud for public good projects.